Union Parliament ICSE Class 10 Board Exam Questions And Answers

Study Material

Students of ICSE Class 10 should refer to Union Parliament ICSE Class 10 Questions and answers below which have come in past board exams. You should always go through questions which have come in previous years so that you can understand the pattern of questions in ICSE Class 10 History and prepare accordingly. This will help you to get better marks in ICSE Class 10 Board Exams

ICSE Class 10 Union Parliament Questions and Answers

Please refer to solved questions for chapter Union Parliament provided below. These questions and answers are expected to come in the examinations. Students should learn these so that they are able to answer the questions properly in exams and get good marks. Refer to Important Questions for ICSE Class 10 History and Civics for all chapters on our website.

Union Parliament Questions and Answers

Short Answer Type Questions

(1) What is meant by Parliament?
Ans. Parliament is the legislative organ of the government at the national level. It controls the executive and finances of the nation. It is a body of people’s representatives responsible for the overall governance of the country.

(2) What is meant by federal structure of government?
Ans. In a federal structure, there are two sets of governments – the Union government and the State government. There is a division of legislative power and administrative autority between the centre and the states.

(3) State the difference between Unitary and Federal systems.
Ans. (i) A Unitary Government – all the powers are exercised by the Centre alone.
(ii) A Federal Government- The Union government and the State government coexist in a dual set and exercise powers within the spheres mentioned in the Constitution.

(4) Mention the three constituents/components of the Indian parliament.
Ans. The Three components of the Indian Parliament are :
(i) The President of India.
(ii) The Rajya Sabha (i.e. the Upper House or Council of States)
(iii) The Lok Sabha (i.e. the Lower House or House of the People)

(5) Why is the Lok Sabha called the Lower House and the Rajya Sabha as the Upper House?
Ans. The Lok Sabha is called the Lower House as its members are directly elected by the people of India. The Rajya Sabha is called the Upper House as it represents the states of the Union of India.

(6) What is the strength of the Rajya Sabha for elected and nominated members?
Ans. The Rajya Sabha consists of 238 members elected from States and U.T. and 12 nominated members from the field of art, science, social services etc.

(7) Describe the composition of Rajyasabha?
Ans. The strength of the Rajya Sabha is fixed at 250 members. There are two categories of members : the elected members and the nominated members. There are 238 elected members, who represent the states and the Union Territories, including the National Capital Territory, Delhi. The President nominates 12 members to the Rajya Sabha.

(8) Who is the ex-officio chairperson of the Rajya Sabha?
Ans. The Vice-President of India is the Ex-officio Chairman of the Rajya Sabha.

(9) How many members are required to complete the Quorum of the Rajya Sabha?
Ans. A minimum number of members required to be present to conduct a meeting of the Rajya Sabha is known as the Quorum. The Quorum of the Rajya Sabha is one-tenth of its membership. The Presiding Officer adjourns the House or suspends the meeting until there is Quorum.

(10) What are the financial powers of Rajya Sabha?
Ans. Rajya Sabha has negligible financial powers as compared to Lok Sabha. It can neither initiate nor pass Money bill or Union Budget on it’s own.The Rajya Sabha has to give its approval to the money bill passed by the Lok Sabha within 14 days.

(11) Can Rajya Sabha exercise control over executive? Explain.
Ans. Although the Rajya Sabha cannot remove the Council of Ministers from office, yet the members of the Rajya Sabha can make the Council of Ministers responsible by seeking information from them.

(12) State the power where Rajya Sabha enjoys an equal footing with Lok Sabha?
Ans. The Rajya Sabha on an equal footing with Lok Sabha, can impeach the President for violating the Constitution and it can remove a judge of the Supreme Court or High Court. Also for approving the continuation of an Emergency both the houses need to give their majority.

(13) State the special powers of Rajya Sabha. OR What are the exclusive powers of Rajyasabha?
Ans. (i) Under Article 249, it can declare a state subject to be of national importance and empower the Union Parliament to legislate on it by passing a resolution to this effect by 2/3rd majority. (ii) The Rajya Sabha can establish All India Services by passing a resolution to this effect by 2/3rd majority.
(iii) At the time of National Emergency when Lok Sabha is dissolved, Rajya Sabha assumes the role of the Union Parliament

(14) Describe the role of Rajya Sabha in a federal system.
Ans. Though being superfluous Rajya Sabha has many advantages in federal functioning : i. Avoids hasty legislation : It passes certain bills after a thorough discussion and saves the time of Lok Sabha. ii. The Rajya Sabha is a Permanent Chamber: It perfoms the role of a full fledged parliament, if Lok Sabha is dissolved during an Emergency. iii. People get more representation : Nominated members of Rajya Sabha are distinguished in the field of literature, art, science and social service.

(15) How are the Rajya Sabha members elected?
Ans. The members of the Rajya Sabha are elected by a body comprising of elected members of the State Legislative Assemblies of each state. Hence elected MLAs of each state elect members of Rajya Sabha indirectly.

(16) Mention the qualifications of the members of the Rajya Sabha?
Ans. (i) He/She should be a citizen of India.
(ii) He/She should be minimum 30 years of age,
(iii) Should not be an insolvent or of unsound mind or a proclaimed criminal.
(iv) He should not hold any office of profit.

(17) Mention the disqualifications of the members of Rajya Sabha?
Ans. (i) If he/she holds an Office of Profit at the Centre or State;
(ii) If he/she is of unsound mind;
(iii) If he/she is an undischarged insolvent;
(iv) If he/she is an alien; (i.e. a citizen of other country)
(v) If he/she is disqualified under any law of the Parliament. (eg. Anti Defection Law)

(18) What is the term of the Rajya Sabha ? Can it be dissolved?.
Ans. The Rajya Sabha is a Permanent House, hence it cannot be dissolved. Each member is elected for a term of six years. 1/3rd of its total members retire at the end of every two years, and the equal number of new members are elected to fill the vacancies caused by the retirement.

(19) Who presides over the Rajya Sabha meetings? Who elects the Deputy Chairman?
Ans. The Vice-President (Exofficio chairperson of Rajya Sabha) presides over the Rajya Sabha meetings. The Deputy Chairman is elected by the members of the Rajya Sabha amongst themselves. The deputy chairman presides over the meetings of Rajya Sabha in the absence of the vice president.

(20) What is the time limit within which the Rajya Sabha must return a Bill?
Ans. The Rajya Sabha can delay the passing of an ordinary bill for six months but the Money bill for 14 days only.

(21) Discuss the powers of the Rajya Sabha over the Executive. Can it dismiss the government from power?
Ans. The Rajya Sabha exercises some control over the Council of Ministers by asking questions in the Question Hour and the Zero Hour. But Rajya Sabha is not empowered to pass no confidence motion against the ministers. Hence it cannot dismiss the government from power.

(22) How many persons may the President of India nominate as members of the Rajya Sabha and what qualifications, if any, should they possess for nomination to the Rajya Sabha? Ans. The President can nominate 12 members. They have special knowledge or practical experience in fields such as Literature, Science, Art and Social Service. (23) Discuss the composition of the Lok Sabha? Ans. The maximum strength of the Lok Sabha provided by the Constitution is 552. Out of these not more than 530 represent the States and not more than 20 represent the Union Territories. 2 members can be nominated by the President from the Anglo-Indian community.

(24) How is Lok Sabha constituted?
Ans. The Lok Sabha is composed of representatives of the people chosen by direct election on the basis of Universal adult suffrage. The current strength of Lok Sabha is 543. There is reservation of seats for SC\ST.

(25) How many sessions are conducted by Lok Sabha?
Ans. The Session means a period in which the House meets to conduct its business. A period of more than six months must not lapse between two sessions for the Lok Sabha. The Parliament should hold atleast two sessions in a year. Normally three-sessions are held in a year
(i) Summer session (Feb-May)
(ii) Monsoon session (July-Sept)
(iii) Winter session (Nov-Dec)

(26) Who is Presiding Officer of Lok Sabha? How is he elected?
Ans. The Presiding Officer of the directly elected House of the People i.e., the Lok Sabha is the Speaker. He is one of the highest constitutional functionaries in India’s Parliamentary System. Speaker is elected from within the Lok Sabha by a simple majority of members present and voting in the House.

(27) State the disciplinary functions of Speaker?
Ans. Disciplinary Functions :
(i) Maintains order in the house. (ii) Decides regarding breach of privilege and Contempt of the House.
(iii) Under the Anti-Defection Act of 1985, the Speaker is vested with the power relating to the disqualification of a member of the Lok Sabha.

(28) State the functions of the Speaker related to Parliamentary Committees.
Ans. (i) The Committees of the House function under the overall direction of the Speaker. Speaker is the exofficio chairperson of the Business Advisory Committee and Rules Committee.
(ii) The Chairmen of all Parliamentary Committees are appointed by him. The Speaker gives direction to them on all matters related to their work and procedures to be followed.

(29) How does the Speaker regulate the business of the House?
Ans. (i) Presides over the meetings of the House and conducts its proceedings.
(ii) Decides the admissibility of a question, resolution and motion of adjournment.
(iii) The Speaker interprets the rules of procedure in the House.
(iv) Certifies whether a Bill is a Money Bill or an Ordinary Bill.
(v) Exercises his casting vote in case of a tie.

(30) How does the Lok Sabha control the finances of our nation?
Ans. The Lok Sabha has supreme authority over financial affairs. All the Moneybills can be introduced first in the Lok Sabha alone. The Lok Sabha has the financial control over matters like levying or abolishing taxes and passing Union Budget.

(31) How many members can the President nominate to the Lok Sabha ? What is the criteria for the nomination?
Ans. The President can nominate two members of the Anglo-Indian Community in case the President feels that the community has not been adequately represented.

(32) How are the members of the Lok Sabha elected?
Ans. The members of the Lok Sabha are elected directly on the basis of Universal Adult Franchise. Each State and Union Territory is divided into various constituencies and each constituency elects one member. The elected candidate occupies a seat in Lok Sabha and represents his/her constituency.

(33) What is a constituency?
Ans. It is a well defined territorial area with a body of voters where voting is conducted to elect a member for representation in Lok Sabha or Legislative Assembly.

(34) What is the maximum period that shall not intervene between the two sessions of the Parliament?
Ans. The Session means a period in which the House meets to conduct its business. A period of more than six months must not lapse between two sessions for the Lok Sabha. The Parliament should hold atleast two sessions in a year.

(35) How are the Speaker and the Deputy Speaker of the Lok Sabha elected?
Ans. The Speaker and the Deputy Speaker of the Lok Sabha are elected by the members from amongst themselves by simple majority.

(36) Mention important administrative functions of the Lok Sabha Speaker.
Ans. (i) receive petitions and documents addressed to the House. (ii) Regulates the admission to the visitors and press correspondents to the galleries of the House. (iii) Communicates the decisions of the House to the concerned autorities.

(37) What is the constitutional provision with regard to the representation of the Anglo-Indian Community in the Lok Sabha ?
Ans. The President of India can nominate two members of the community if not adequately represented.

(38) Who presides over the Lok Sabha in the absence of the Speaker and Deputy Speaker?
Ans. In the absence of the Speaker and the Deputy Speaker, one of the six members of the Panel chosen by the Speaker, presides over the Lok Sabha.

(39) An Adult Indian citizen holding an office of profit under the State Government wishes to contest for election to the Lok Sabha. Is he/ she eligible ? Give a reason to justify your answer?
Ans. No, he is not eligible because according to the Constitution of India, an M.P. or M.L.A. cannot hold any office of profit under the government of India or of any state.

(40) What are the advantages of the Lok Sabha?
Ans. (i) Lok Sabha is considered the mirror and voice of the nation as its members are directly elected by the people.
(ii) It is the Lok Sabha which makes, supports and throws out governments.

(41) Whom does the President summon to form a government after the election to the Lok Sabha? In what circumstances can the Lok Sabha exceed its regular term?
Ans. The leader of the majority party is summoned by the president to form a government after the election to the Lok Sabha. During the proclamation of an emergency the period of the Lok Sabha may be extended by Parliament for one year at a time.

(42) What are the special powers enjoyed by Lok Sabha?
Ans. (i) Motions of No-confidence against the government can only be introduced and passed in the Lok Sabha;
(ii) Money Bills can be introduced only in the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha cannot reject or amend it. (iii) In case of a deadlock between the two Houses, the will of the Lok Sabha prevails due to its greater numerical strength.

(43) Why did India choose federal form of government over unitary?
Ans : In a Unitary State, all powers are vested in the Central government, whereas in a Federal State, the powers are divided between the Central and the State governments. Legislative powers and administrative authority are divided among both the governments by the constitution.

(44) How are Lok Sabha seats allotted ?
Ans : On the basis of the population in the state, the terrritory of the state is divided into constituencies or electoral districts. Each electoral district is allotted one seat in the Lok Sabha. India is divided into 543 single member constituencies for Lok Sabha Elections.

(45) Union Parliament is more poweful than the States in legislative matters. Prove.
Ans. (i) The Parliament has exclusive powers to make laws on all the 97 subjects mentioned in the Union List, including important subjects like defence, communication, foreign policy etc.
(ii) The Parliament can also make laws on 67 subjects in the State List in the following situation :
(a) During the Proclamation of Emergency,
(b) When the Rajya Sabha declares by a resolution with 2/3 majority that a State-list subject has gained national importance.
(iii) Even on a subject in the Concurrent List, both the Parliament and a State legislature may make a law, but the law made by the Parliament supersedes the law of the State Legislature. This establishes the superiority of the Parliament over the State Legislatures.

(46) State financial powers of Lok Sabha?
Ans. The Lok Sabha controls the national finances as follows :
(i) The Budget : It has the power to pass the annual Budget of the Union Government for the financial year.
(ii) Salaries of the MP’s and the Ministers : The MP’s and the ministers receive such salaries and allowances as are determined by the Parliament from time to time.
(iii) Permission for taxes : No tax can be imposed or money is spent by the government without the approval of the Lok Sabha.
(iv) Money bill : A money bill can be introduced in the Lok Sabha only.

(47) State any two parliamentary measures to control executives.
Ans. (i) Censure Motion, expressing disapproval of the policies of the Government may be moved against the Council of Ministers or an individual Minister in the Lok Sabha. It can result in the resignation of the Council of Ministers or only the individual minister as the case may be. To censure government policy or individual executive action reason is specified.
(ii) A No Confidence Motion against the Council of Ministers may be moved in the Lok Sabha. If it is passed, the Government has to resign. No reasons are stated to move No Confidence motion.

(48) Which two devices can the MPs avail for financial support from Loksabha ?
Ans. (i) Supplementary Grants : If the amount sanctioned under the Demand for Grants in a financial year is found to be insufficient, the Government can make a fresh demand for Supplementary Grants.
(ii) Vote on Accounts : Vote on Accounts is a measure to draw money from the Consolidated Fund of India if the Union Budget is not passed before the beginning of the new financial year i.e. from April 1.

(49) State the powers of Parliament to impeach and elect functionaries ?
Ans. (i) The Parliament exercises the power to impeach the President or to remove a judge of the Supreme Court or High Court.
(ii) Elected MPs are a part of Electoral college to elect the President. The Vice- President of India is elected by members of both the Houses. The Lok Sabha also elects its Speaker and Deputy Speaker. The Rajya Sabha elects the deputy chairperson.

(50) Which types of questions are raised during the Question Hour ?
Ans. The first hour of a sitting in both the Houses is devoted to questions. A member has to give 10 days notice to raise following types of questions.
1. Starred : Member desires an oral answer in the House, for a question that bears an asterisk mark. Supplementary questions can be asked thereon.
2. Unstarred: A written answer is expected from the Minister to whom it is addressed.
3. Short Notice Question : A Short Notice question is one which relates to a matter of urgent public importance and be asked with a notice shorter than ten days.

(51) What do you mean by Zero Hour ?
Ans. The Zero Hour denotes the time immediately following the Question Hour in both houses of Parliament. It starts at 12 noon. It came to be called an ‘Hour’ also because very often it continued for one full hour, until the House rose for lunch at
1 p.m. Members raise all types of questions without any permission or prior notice.

(52) What do you mean by a Motion ? State any two Motions in Parliamentary procedures ?
Ans. A Motion is a proposal for eliciting decision or expressing the opinion of the House on a matter of public importance Censure Motion : It is a motion censuring some policy of the government or of an individual minister. It may express indignation or surprise of the House at the failure of the government. The member should state the reasons why he is moving the Censure Motion. Its specifies the policies or acts that are being censured or criticised. Motion of No-confidence : If the Lok Sabha expresses a lack of confidence in the Council of Ministers, the Government is constitutionally bound to resign. This is called a No- Confidence motion.

(53) What do you mean by a Adjournment Motion ?
Ans. Adjournment Motion : An Adjournment Motion means a proposal to lay aside all other business and take up a ‘definite matter of urgent importance’. Such a Motion leads to the interruption of normal business of the House. Adjournment Motions are generally allowed on subjects such as raliway accident resluting in the death of several persons; a daring dacoity, some natural calamity like a devastating flood or a tornado, communal tension, etc.

(54) What is the primary object of an Adjournment Motion ?
Ans. The primary object of an Adjournment motion is to draw the attention of the House to a recent matter of urgent public importance having serious consequences and in regard to which a motion or a resolution with proper notice will be too late.

(55) State the difference between Adjournment and Prorogation of the House?
Ans. Adjournment is different from Prorogation. Adjournment suspends the sitting of the House. The Speaker or the Presiding officer has the power to adjourn the House. Prorogation ends the session. This can be done by the President alone.

(56) What is meant by Budget ? Who introduces the Budget ?
Ans. The Annual Financial Statement of the estimated Receipts and Expenditure of the Government of India is termed as Budget. As these are money bills, these originate only in the Lok Sabha.

(57) How is the deadlock removed between the two Houses to pass the Ordinary Bill? OR What is the procedure that should be followed if there is a deadlock between the two Houses of Parliament over a Non-Money Bill?
Ans. If a deadlock arises between the two Houses, the President summons a joint sitting. The bill is placed before the joint sitting and the issue is decided by a majority vote.

(58) Who presides over the joint session of the Parliament?
Ans. The Speaker of the Lok Sabha presides over the joint session of the Parliament.

(59) What options are available to the President when an Ordinary bill is sent him?
Ans. When an Ordinary bill is sent to the President:
(a) he can give his assent.
(b) May not give his assent, in this case the bill goes back to the House of Parliament where it was initiated.

(60) What is the difference between a Money Bill and a Non-money Bill?

Union Parliament ICSE Class 10 Questions

(61) Which House is considered to be more powerful-the Lok Sabha or the Rajya Sabha? State two reasons to justify your answer :
Ans. The Lok Sabha is more powerful than the Rajya Sabha. This is because:
(a) Introduction of Money Bill : No money bill can be introduced in the Rajya Sabha. When the money bill is sent to the Rajya Sabha, it can not reject it. It can give its suggestions within 14 days. If it does not send the bill within 14 days, the Bill is deemed to have been passed.
(b) No Confidence Motion : The Council of ministers is collectively responsible to the Lok Sabha and not to Rajya Sabha. Hence a Noconfidence motion can be moved only in Lok Sabha.

(62) How are the subjects of legislation allocated between the Union and the States?
Ans. In the division of powers 97 items are included in the Union List, while the State List contains only 67 items. Further, even on the subjects contained in the Concurrent List (47 of them), both the Centre and the States have power to legislate, but the Central Government enjoys an oveerriding position.

(63) What is Concurrent List? Who can legislate on it?
Ans. The Concurrent List contains all subjects on which both State Legislature as well as the Union Parliament can make laws. If there is a conflict the Union law will prevail and the law made by State Legislature stands cancelled.

(64) What are Residuary Powers?
Ans. The Parliament possesses residuary powers. It means that it can make laws with respect to all those matters which are not mentioned in any of the three Lists – the Union List, the State List and the Concurrent List.

(65) Mention two main circumstances in which the Parliament can legislate on State subject?
Ans. Parliame nt can le gislate on State Subje ct unde r the following circumstances :
(a) During the Proclamation of an Emergency.
(b) When the Rajya Sabha passes a resolution by a two-thirds majority that a subject in the State List has assumed national importance.
(c) When two or more States are of the opinion that the Parliament should legislate on a subject given in the State List, the Parliament may make an Act on that subject but that would be applicable only to the consenting States.

(66) Mention two ways through which the Parliament exercises control on finances ?
Ans. The Parliament exercises control over Finances through:
(a) The Budget : The Parliament passes the Union Budget containing the estimates of receipts and expenditure of the Government for the Financial Year.
(b) Fixation of Salaries : The salaries and allowances of MPs and Ministers are determined by the Parliament.

(67) In which three ways does the Parliament exercise control over the Executive? OR Mention any two devices through which the Lok Sabha exercises control over the Council of ministers.
Ans. (a) The Question Hour : In this time (11 a.m. to 12 noon) the House seeks information from the government about its policies and performances.
(b) Adjournment Motions : With the adjournment motion, the routine business of the House is postponed to discuss an urgent matter.
(c) Monetary Controls : The Public Accounts Committee of the Parliament keeps a check to ensure that public money is spent in accordance with Parliament’s decision.

(68) Mention two electoral functions of the Union Parliament.
Ans. (i) The elected members of both the House of the Parliament alongwith members of the Legislative Assemblies constitute the Electoral College to elect the President of India.
(ii) It also elects its Speaker and Deputy Speaker.

(69) What is a Money Bill? Who decides whether a Bill is a Money Bill or an Ordinary Bill?
Ans. A bill having a financial bearing is called a Money Bill. The Speaker of the Lok Sabha decides whether a Bill is Money Bill or not. It is related to taxation, government debt or expenditure.

(70) What is the consequence of that Money Bill, which is passed by the Lok Sabha, but not passed by the Rajya Sabha?
Ans. When a Money Bill is not passed by the Rajya Sabha within 14 days, the bill is deemed to have been passed by the parliament. Lok Sabha is powered to pass Money Bill on it’s own accord and role of Rajya Sabha in this matter is recommendatory only.

(71) What is meant by the “Consolidated Fund of India” ?
Ans. All revenues received by the government of India, all money raised by loans and received in repayment of loans shall form the “Consolidated Fund of India”.

(72) Mention two ways in which the Constitution can be amended.
Ans. The Constitution can be amended in either of the following ways.
(a) The amendment must be passed by each House by a simple majority of total membership and by a two-thirds majority of members present and voting in the House.
(b) In certain cases, the amendment requires the ratification or approval of not less than half of the Legislative Assemblies of the States as well.

(73) In which matters does the Rajya Sabha enjoy equal powers with the Lok Sabha ?
Ans. (i) In the election of the President and Vice President.
(ii) In the removal of the President (Impeachment).
(iii) A non-money bill can originate in either House.

(74) State the ways in which the Speaker ensure discipline in the House.
Ans. (i) To maintain order in the House the unruly members may be asked to withdraw. The Speaker may suspend a member or suspend the House if necessary.
(ii) Speaker may order to expunge the indecent or unparliamentary words from the proceedings of the House.
(iii) Speaker decides over ‘Breach of privilege’ or ‘Contempt of the House’
(iv) Disqualifies a member under Anti-Defection Law.

(75) Who is empowered to disqualify the member of Parliament?
Ans. The Speaker is empowered to decide over the disqulification of an MP held up under the Anti-Defection Law. In cases other than Defection the President’s decision in accordance with the opinion of Election Commission shall be final.

(76) State the situations in which the seat of an MP falls vacant.
Ans. Following situations leads to vacation of seat:
(i) Resignation
(ii) Absence from all meetings of the House for a continual period of 60 working days without permission of the House.
(iii) If an MLA is elected to the Parliament or vice-versa.
(iv) Disqualification under Anti-Defection Law.

(77) What is the role of the Parliament with respect to the Ordinance promulgated by the President?
Ans. The President is empowered to promulgate an Ordinance at a time when the Parliament is not in session. It has the same effect as an Act. All Ordinances must be put up before both the Houses for their approval. Ordinances cease to operate after six weeks from the re-assembly of Parliament, unless they are approved by the Houses.

(78) Under what circumstances can the term of Lok Sabha be extended?
Ans. During the proclamation of an emergency the period of the Lok Sabha may be extended by the Parliament for one year at a time. The new Lok Sabha must be elected within six months after the national emergency is lifted.

(79) Which circumstances lead to adjournment of the House?
Ans. The House is adjourned:
(i) After the business for the day is over;
(ii) when the death of a sitting/ex-member of the House occurs;
(iii) when there is so much disorder in the House that it is difficult to conduct the business;
(iv) for want of quorum; or
(v) as and when the Speakers finds it necessary.

(80) What is a Quorum? OR What is the minimal presence of members required for the House to transact its business?
Ans. The quorum means the minimum number of members required to be present in order to enable the House to transact its business. The quorum of the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha is one-tenth of the total membership of each House. This means that the House cannot conduct its proceedings and pass Bills and resolutions without the presence of at least one-tenth of its total membership.

(81) Define the term Question Hour. How does it facilitate transparency in government functioning?
Ans. The first hour on every working day of the House is reserved for questions unless otherwise is decided by the Speaker. This hour (which usually starts at 11 am) is known as the Question Hour. It is intended to keep the functioning of the government open to scrutiny by the members. A member of the House may ask questions from the Government on matters of public interest.

(82) State the special powers of the Lok Sabha
Ans. (i) A no-confidence motion against the government can be introduced only in the Lok Sabha. If passed with majority the P.M. and his Council of Ministers will collectively resign.
(ii) Money Bills can be introduced and passed only in Lok Sabha..
(iii) In case of a deadlock over non-money bill, the will of Lok Sabha will prevail because of its numerical strength.

(83) State the role of president in passing the laws of the country.
Ans. After a Bill has been passed by both the Houses of Parliament, it is presented to the President for his assent. If the President gives his assent, the bill become an Act. If he refuses his assent the bill comes back to the House where it had originated. If the bill is sent back to the President with or without any change, a second time, he must give his assent to it. After getting the President’s assent, it becomes a Law or an Act.

Structured Questions

(1) With reference to the Rajya Sabha, answer the following questions :
(a) How are the members of the Rajya Sabha elected ?
(b) What are the qualifications of the members of the House?
(c) What is the term of the House and tenure of each member ?
Ans. (a) The members of the Rajya Sabha from each State are elected by the elected members of the Legislative Assembly of that State.The representatives of the Union Territories are chosen in such a manner as may be prescribed by the Parliament.

(b) In order to become a member of the Rajya Sabha, a person must possess the following qualifications:
(i) He should be a citizen of India.
(ii) He should be at least of 30 years.
(iii) Should not be a proclaimed criminal.
(iv) He should ordinarily be a resident of the State or Union Territory from where he/she is seeking election.
(v) Should not be an insolvent or of unsound mind.

(c) The Rajya Sabha is a Permanent House. It cannot be dissolved. Each member has a term of six years. One third of its total number of members retire at the end of every two years, and the equal number of new members are elected or nominated to fill the vacancies caused by the retirement of l/3rd members. Thus, the Rajya Sabha continues to exist, though its members retire when they complete their six years tenure. They can also be re-elected or renominated.

(2) In view of the Lok Sabha, answer the following –
(a) Qualifications of a member of the Lok Sabha.
(b) Disqualifications of a member of the Lok Sabha.
(c) Term of the Lok Sabha. Can it be reduced ?
(d) Annual schedule of the Parliamentary session.
Ans. (a) In order to be elected as a member of the Lok Sabha, a person must :
(i) Be a citizen of India,
(ii) Be at least twenty five years of age and
(iv) Also be registered as a voter in any of the Parliamentary constituencies.
(v) Not be an insolvent or of unsound mind.

(b) A person shall be disqualified to become the member of the Lok Sabha:
(i) If he holds an office of profit in the Centre or a State (The office of a Minister or Deputy Minister is not regarded as an office of Profit for the purpose).
(ii) If he is of unsound mind declared by a competent court.
(iii) If he is an undischarged insolvent.
(iv) If he is a proclaimed offender or criminal.
(v) If disqualified under Anti Defection Law.

(c) The term of the Lok Sabha is five years. But it can be dissolved earlier by the President if a motion expressing ‘No-Confidence’ against the Government is moved and passed by the opposition.

(d) The President calls the session of the Lok Sabha, at least two times in a year, provided that not more than six months should pass between the two sessions. The President can also call a special session. Normally, as per the practice, three sessions are held in a year :
(i) Budget Session (from February to April).
(ii) Monsoon Session (July to September).
(iii) Winter Session (November to December).

(3) What are the powers and functions of the Speaker with reference to the following :
(a) Disciplinary powers
(b) Administrative powers
(c) Regulation of Parliamentary procedure
(d) Supervisory control over committees of the Parliament.
Ans. (a) (i) To maintain order in the House, he may name a member for suspension or in case of grave disorder, he may adjourn the House.
(ii) He may expunge word/words from a debate, if it is unparliamentary in his opinion.
(iii) He decides cases of breach of privilege or contempt of the House.

(b) (i) He receives all documents and petitions sent to the House.
(ii) He communicates decisions of the House to the concerned authorities and requests compliance.
(iii) He allows strangers and press correspondents to the galleries of the House.
(iv) Heads Lok Sabha Secretariat.

(c) He regulates the proceedings and debates in the House.
(i) He presides over its meetings and allots time for discussion on matters mentioned in President’s address. All remarks and speeches are addressed to the Speaker.
(ii) Decides about the admissibility of all Questions, Resolutions and Adjournment Motions.
(iii) Signs all the Bills to signify their passage in the Lok Sabha, before they are sent to the other House or to the President for assent.
(iv) He decides whether a bill is a Money Bill or an Ordinary Bill.
(v) Interprets the rules of procedure.
(vi) He puts questions to vote and exercises the casting vote in case of a tie.

(d) (i) He is the ex-officio Chairman of the Rules Committee and the Business Advisory Committee of the House.
(ii) He appoints Chairmen of all committees of the House and issues them directions regarding their work.
(iii) He decides whether a particular document is secret or not and whether to be placed before a committee or not.

(4) As far as the legistative powers of the Union Parliament are concerned, answer the following :
(a) Union List
(b) State List
(c) Concurrent List
(d) Residuary Powers
Ans. (a) Powers over Union List : The Parliament has exclusive powers to make laws on the 97 subjects in the Union List, including important subjects like defence, foreign policy, communications, etc.

(b) Powers over State List :
(i) The Parliament can legislate on 67 subjects included in the State List during the Proclamation of an Emergency.
(ii) During the President’s rule in a State, the Parliament not only passes the laws on the State subjects but also passes the State budget.
(iii) When the Rajya Sabha passes a resolution with two-thirds majority that a subject in the State List has assumed national importance, the Union Parliament can legislate on that subject.
(iv) When two or more States are of the opinion that the Parliament should legislate on a subject given in the State List, but that would be applicable only to the consenting states.

(c) Powers over Concurrent List :
(i) The Legislative Assembly and Parliament can make laws on 47 subjects listed in the Concurrent List. If there is any conflict between the Union Parliament and the State Legislature on any law over this list, the Union Law will prevail.

(d) Residuary Powers :
The Parliament possesses residuary powers. It means that it can make laws with respect to all those matters which are not mentioned in any of the three Lists – the Union List, the State List and the Concurrent List.

(5) In view of the financial powers of the Parliament, explain the following:
(a) Passing of the Annual Budget.
(b) Supplementary Grants,
(c) Vote on Account.
Ans. (a) The Parliament has the power to pass the Annual Budget of the Union Government for the financial year. It contains estimates of receipts (income) and expenditure.
The estimates on expenditure in the General Budget are shown in two parts :
(i) Expenditure charged on the Consolidated Fund of India.
(ii) Estimates required to meet the other expenditure of the Government of India.

(b) If the amount sanctioned under the Demand for Grants in a financial year is found to be insufficient, the Government can make a fresh demand known as the Supplementary Grants. It is also thoroughly debated and voted upon in the Lok Sabha. It can also sanction expenditure on contingencies.

(c) Vote on Account is a measure to authorise the Executive to draw money from the Consolidated Fund of India from April 1 i.e., the beginning of the new financial year, till the Budget is finally passed by the Parliament. The Lok Sabha has the power to pass the Vote on Account.

(6) With reference to the powers of the Parliament, discuss the following:
(a) Impeachment of President and Judges of the Supreme Court and High Court.
(b) Passing of Money Bill.
(c) Permission for Taxes.
Ans. (a) Impeachment of President and Judges of the Supreme Court and High Court : The Parliament has the right to remove the President from office through a procedure called “impeachment”. In case of violation of the Constitution, either House may frame charges against the President.
If a resolution to this effect is passed by two-thirds majority of total membership of the House and by majority of members present and voting, the other House investigates the charges. If the other House too finds the President guilty, he may be impeached and removed from office.
The Parliament can remove the Chief Justice/ Judges of the Supreme Court on the grounds of proven misbehaviour or incapacity in the same manner as is done in the case of the President of India.

(b) Passing of Money Bill :
(i) Bills which exclusively contain provisions for imposition, alteration and abolition of taxes, regulations governing the borrowings and payment of money into or withdrawal of money from the Consolidated Fund or Contingency Fund of India, etc., are certified as Money Bills.
All bills other than Money bills are called Ordinary bills.
(ii) The Speaker of the Lok Sabha decides whether a Bill is a Money Bill or an Ordinary Bill.
(iii) A Money Bill must be recommended by the President.
(iv) A Money Bill can be introduced in the Lok Sabha only and not in the Rajya Sabha. However, when it is passed in the Lok Sabha, it is sent to the Rajya Sabha.
(v) The Rajya Sabha cannot reject a Money Bill. It can give its suggestion within 14 days.
(vi) The Lok Sabha can reject all or any of its recommendations. The Lok Sabha, thus, is the final authority so far as the Money bills are concerned.
(vii) After being passed by the Parliment, it is sent to the President for his assent. He cannot refuse his assent.

(c) Permission for Taxes :
(i) No tax can be imposed or money spent by the government without the approval of the Parliament. In matters of finance the Lok Sabha enjoys more powers that the Rajya Sabha.
(ii) Money Bills can be introduced only in the Lok Sabha. Once the Money Bills go to the Rajya Sabha they have to be sent back to the Lok Sabha within 14 days. The Lok Sabha may accept or reject the recommendations of the Rajya Sabha.

(7) Indian Parliament can control the Executive, if necessary. In this context explain :
(a) Adjournment Motion.
(b) The Question Hour (Interpellation)
(c) Other Motions of Censure
Ans. (a) Adjournment Motion : The Executive can be criticized in Parliament through the Adjournment Motions which are generally tabled on serious and urgent matters like police firing on a peaceful procession, a railway accident, or some natural calamity. The real object of an adjournment motion is to bring to light the inefficiency of the government in handling a particular situation. Discussion of items listed in the agenda for the day is suspended and members devote the time to a discussion of the subject of the Adjournment Motion.

(b) The Question Hour (Interpellation) : Members of Parliament have the right to ask questions with regard to the policies of the Union Government.
The questions may be followed by supplementary questions for seeking more information. It is known as the ‘Question Hour’. Through interpellation the Ministers are criticized for the flaws and lapses on their part. Thus the inefficiency of the government is brought to light.

(c) Other Motions of Censure : The Parliment exercises its control overthe Govenment by other motions which, if passed, amount to noconfidence.
They include: motions of censure against a minister, rejection of a Government Bill, passing of a private members bill against the wishes of the Government, etc.

(8) Discuss the relationship between the two houses of the Parliament in reference to the following points:
(a) Ordinary Bill and Money Bill
(b) Control over Executive
(c) Elections and Impeachment
Ans. (a) Ordinary Bill and Money Bill :
(i) Ordianary Bill may originate in either House. If there is disagreement between the two Houses, the bill is referred to a joint-sitting of both the Houses.
(ii) Rajya Sabha is in a weaker positon, since the total membership of Rajya Sabha is less than even half of the total strength of the Lok Sabha, Besides, the joint session is presided over by the Speaker of the Lok Sabha.
(iii) In case of Money Bills, the Rajya Sabha has virually no powers. It cannot reject a Money Bill nor amend it by virtue of its own powers. It must, within the stipulated period of 14 days, return the Bill of the Lok Sabha. which may thereupon either accept or reject all or any of the recommendations of the Rajya Sabha.

(b) Control over Executive :
(i) Members of both the Houses can ask questions to ministers about the work of their departments. But the Lok Sabha is more powerful than the Rajya Sabha.
(ii) Rajya Sabha cannot pass a Motion expressing No-Confidence in the Council of Ministers. Adjournment Motion, indicating a strong disapproval of the policy of Government is moved only in Lok Sabha.

(c) Elections and Impeachment :
(i) Every elected member of the Parliament stands on equal footing in the election of the President or the Vice President of India. However, the Lok Sabha has a greater say on such matters because of the strength of its numbers.
(ii) In matters of impeachment of the President of India or the Chief Justice or a Judge of the Supreme Court or of a High Court, both Houses have absolutely equal powers. Impeachment can be initiated in either House and the other House has an equal say in the judgement.

The Union Parliament Class 10 ICSE MCQ Questions and Answers

Check Our The Union Parliament Class 10 ICSE MCQ Questions with Answers free Pdf download. The Union Parliament Class 10 ICSE MCQ Questions are prepared according to the latest exam pattern of Icse boards. We have Provided you The Union Parliament MCQ Questions ICSE with Answers to make your preparation to score good marks in the Class 10 exam.

Q1. Who presides over the meetings of Lok Sabha?
a. Any minister
b. President
c. Speaker
d. Prime Minister

Answer

C

Q2. By whom the Oath of Office to the members of Parliament is administered?
a. Both a & c
b. President
c. Prime Minister
d. Speaker

Answer

B

Q3. Who nominates the Anglo-Indian Community in the Lok Sabha?
a. President
b. Prime Minister
c. Speaker
d. Vice President

Answer

A

Q4. How many houses are there in the Parliament?
a. None of them
b. Six
c. Two
d. Three

Answer

C

Q5. Choose among the following the law-making body at the central level:
a. Cabinet Ministers
b. Executive
c. Parliament
d. President

Answer

C

Q6. The three organs of of the Indian Government are _ , and Judiciary.
a. None of them
b. Legislature, Ministers
c. The legislature, Prime Minister
d. Executive, Legislature

Answer

D

Q7. What does the Parliament consist of?
a. Both a & c
b. Lok Sabha & Rajya Sabha
c. Prime Minister
d. The President

Answer

A

Q8. Select the maximum number of members in Lok Sabha
a. 230
b. 554
c. 550
d. 552

Answer

D

Q9. What is the minimum age requirement to be a member of Lok Sabha?
a. 45
b. 21
c. 25
d. 18

Answer

C

Q10. The normal tenure of the Lok Sabha is
a. 5 years
b. 6 years
c. 10 years
d. 2 years

Answer

A

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